Future Mobility Day

/Future Mobility Day
Future Mobility Day 2018-07-06T16:34:46+00:00
607, 2018

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SEDRIC_in_motion_02 (c) VWAG

Future Mobility Day 2018

The mobility of the future is being created by consistent research and strategic development. The SEDRIC autonomous concept car, self-driving transport units for goods deliveries, learning assistance systems, augmented-reality technology for enhanced safety in road traffic, 3D printing procedures, the transformation of engine heat into electricity, vehicle sensors to measure air quality and innovative methods for developing batteries for electric vehicles are among the projects that Volkswagen Group Research is presenting at the Mobility Day 2018 and which will define mobile life in the future.

Volkswagen Group Research is defining the trajectory for innovations that will exert a defining influence on the mobility experience of tomorrow. It carries out fundamental scientific research work, identifies relevant trends and acts as an incubator and driver of ideas for the entire company. “Our central function is to drive forward innovations with the objective of offering our customers throughout the world products and services with outstanding technology,” commented Axel Heinrich, Head of Volkswagen Group Research. … more

SEDRIC – Level 5 Driving Experience
SEDRIC – Level 5 Driving Experience
SEDRIC is the first self-driving car from the Volkswagen Group and it has been engineered for automated driving to Level 5. At the Future Mobility Day 2018, the mobility of the future can be experienced during a demonstration drive. The latest innovations are presented focusing on the area of interior design. SEDRIC has a new air-conditioning concept that allows the entire interior to be ventilated indirectly by invisible air outlets that are configured in the ceiling and the floor of the vehicle. The additional current functions of the engineers include further development of the Human Machine Interface (HMI) so that SEDRIC is able to offer an all-round perfect mobility experience – from the booking stage to alighting from the vehicle at the destination. No less important is the interaction between SEDRIC and other road users. It contributes to making autonomous driving a particularly safe form of mobility for everyone.
Technologies for Automated Driving
Technologies for Automated Driving
Automated driving places particularly high requirements on the systems and algorithms used for this application. This is especially the case in innercity areas where the issue is becoming increasingly important in strategic terms. The entire software stack for automated driving is being developed in this project. Familiar elements are algorithms for localisation, environment perception, scene interpretation and trajectory planning. Artificial intelligence is becoming increasingly important. Alongside functional software modules, work is also being carried out on important topics such as uncertainty assessment for neural networks. The development of software for automated driving, which can be used for different levels of automation in all types of vehicle from small passenger cars to heavy-duty commercial vehicles, will facilitate broadly based application with the brands of the Volkswagen group.
Traffic Impact and Service Design of Shared Urban Mobility
Traffic Impact and Service Design of Shared Urban Mobility
What impact do new mobility services, for example ride pooling, exert on traffic and the environment in a city? A “microscopic traffic simulation” is investigating different city conurbations in order to provide answers for this question. This is intended to take account of the impacts from the perspective of providers (fleet utilisation; fleet size; vehicle occupancy) as well as the impacts on consumers (waiting time; total journey time) and on the general population, represented by government authorities (total number of kilometres covered; CO2 emissions). Furthermore, the study covers important success factors for provision of an attractive mobility service. These include for example the importance of a relocation strategy for the fleet, impacts of distances for virtual stopping stations and necessary vehicle ranges.
Autonomous Driving Device: A customized and Last Mile Logistic Service
Autonomous Driving Device: A customized and Last Mile Logistic Service
Delivery traffic is a spiralling burden in urban conurbations. Conventional transport vehicles carrying goods to retail outlets or directly to customers disrupt the traffic flow because they take up parking spaces and additional space at the side of the road. Autonomous transport units can relieve the situation since they can be used for the last mile on the journey to the recipient of the goods. A comprehensive analysis is investigating the requirements of potential operators and potential customers for such a transport unit alongside the necessary prerequisites and impacts in the area of traffic infrastructure. Additional components of the project are design drafts for an autonomous transport system and presentation of corresponding business cases.
HMI for External Communication: Improved Interaction with Pedestrians and Bikes
HMI for External Communication: Improved Interaction with Pedestrians and Bikes
The use of an innovative Human Machine Interface (HMI) outside vehicles can improve driving safety and communication in present or future complex traffic situations. In situations where drivers of passenger cars or trucks have an opportunity to communicate with more vulnerable traffic participants such as pedestrians and cyclists about intentions and plans, hazard moments are largely avoided. The aim of this project is to create an HMI outside vehicles and to develop an intuitively understandable language for this new form of communication. Various visual and acoustic prototypes and a concept vehicle are shown. The project content is also accessible in an experience world based on Virtual Reality. This interactive experience is completed by the joint presentation of different future mobility concepts within this virtual world.
Augmented Experience: Holistic AR-Driven Mobility by Car and Foot
Augmented Experience: Holistic AR-Driven Mobility by Car and Foot
Augmented Reality (AR) is developing into an important and fascinating topic in future driver interaction concepts. The expansion of information perceived by the driver resulting from artificially generated representations that are projected into the driver’s view of the real world can improve the situative analysis and the response behaviour of the driver. An innovative Human Machine Interface (HMI) initiative is presented within the framework of an AR demonstration. An outsized Head-up Display (HUD) was installed in the prototype displayed. This has a field of view of 13° x 6°, almost four times as big as comparable series products. The applied technologies enable the virtual alerts to be displayed at a distance of 10 metres in front of the vehicle, which creates the illusion of being directly connected to the surroundings. This generates an AR driving experience that supports the driver with the correct information at the right time and displayed directly where the action is taking place.
Vision Zero – Safe Driving Experience: Risk Awareness for Automated Driving
Vision Zero – Safe Driving Experience: Risk Awareness for Automated Driving
Sieben Patentanmeldungen für Schlüsseltechnologien des autonomen Fahrens hat der Volkswagen Konzern seit dem Jahr 2017 eingereicht. Eine davon soll selbstfahrende Autos in die Lage versetzen, Fußgängerszenarien – vorhersehbare und unvorhersehbare – zu erfassen und wie ein menschlicher Fahrer zu beurteilen. Hierbei handelt es sich um das erste jemals vorgestellte System, das vorausschauendes Fahren, Risikobewusstsein, Kollisionsvermeidung und fortschrittliche Fahrzeugsteuerung vereint – und so einen wichtigen Beitrag zur Sicherheit im zukünftigen Straßenverkehr leistet. Ermöglicht wird dies unter anderem durch einen neuen Low-Level-Ansatz zur Sensordatenfusion (Superpositions-Sensor). Wie das neuartige autonome Fahrsystem in der Praxis funktioniert, wird im Rahmen der Präsentation des Systems am Beispiel eines VW e-Golf gezeigt. Der Volkswagen Konzern leistet mit dem neuartigen ganzheitlichen Ansatz zur Quantifizierung und Minimierung von Unfallrisiken einen wichtigen Beitrag zur Erhöhung der Verkehrssicherheit.
Vision Zero – Safe Driving Experience: Guardian Angel
Vision Zero – Safe Driving Experience: Guardian Angel
The very personal guardian angel of car drivers – this is the concept behind the “Guardian Angel” project. The deep-learning model of the assistance system registered for a patent can already determine the individual driver profile after a driving time of just a few minutes. It intervenes to provide assistance if the current individual driving parameters indicate that this is necessary. This ensures a definitively high safety experience for the driver and a high level of acceptance. The live demonstration provides three consecutive scenarios for safe driver experience at right-before-left junctions, in corners and ahead of overtaking manoeuvres. The predictive support based on driver intentions provided by the assistance system includes the creation of situation awareness, communication of warning alerts and active interventions in vehicle control.
Waste-Heat-Recovery (WHR) for Passenger Cars an Heavy Duty Trucks
Waste-Heat-Recovery (WHR) for Passenger Cars an Heavy Duty Trucks
The aim of the project WHR (Waste Heat Recovery) is to convert the heat energy dissipated in the exhaust gas from engines in passenger cars and heavy-duty trucks into useful mechanical or electrical energy. The recovered energy is supplied directly to the drive unit or to a 48-volt onboard electricity system with an energy store. The WHR system is located downstream of the exhaust gas treatment system and conducts the previously unused heat of the exhaust gas to an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC). In this vapour circuit, ethanol is heated to a temperature of 190 to 220 degrees at a system pressure of 10 to 30 bar in an exhaust-gas heat exchanger and evaporated. The ethanol vapour is then re-condensed in an expansion machine. The mechanical or electrical useful work is gained in this process phase. Under real driving conditions, selective use of exchange-gas energy leads to a reduction in consumption and there is a drop in direct CO2 emissions of 3 to 4 percent.
The Efficiency of Powertrains: Key Influence Factors on Life Cycle Assessment
The Efficiency of Powertrains: Key Influence Factors on Life Cycle Assessment
The spotlight is increasingly on environmental indicators for the assessment of drive systems. This study defines the main influences of drivetrain-specific parameters such as energy consumption and CO2 emissions for continuous assessment over the entire life cycle (Life Cycle Assessment, LCA). It therefore supports the group-wide drive and fuel strategy and environmental communication through a better understanding for the results of LCAs. Generally speaking, assessments of this type were carried out on the basis of specific standard consumptions (tank to wheel) determined in defined test cycles and CO2 emissions were calculated during the production phase, as well as static specific emissions for energy provision and emissions during driving. According to the study, conventional vehicles cause around 80 to 85 percent of their CO2 emissions during the usage phase, while this proportion is shifted towards the production phase with increasing electrification. This study is now examining influences resulting from the drivetrain design, climate influences and driving scenarios, alongside future energy trends. The findings gained from the study can exert a particular impact on the ongoing development of drive systems because the CO2 footprint of vehicles differs by plus/minus 33 percent solely due to different driving scenarios and varying climate conditions.
Holistic Aging Model Concepts for Li-Ion Cells: Life Time Prediction under Realistic Driving Conditions
Holistic Aging Model Concepts for Li-Ion Cells: Life Time Prediction under Realistic Driving Conditions
The basis of the investigation model developed in the course of this project is provided by the familiar significant aging mechanisms which lithium-ion batteries are subject to. The new concept for the aging model permits a holistic analysis of the mechanisms and their physical interactions. This model can be used to simulate different operating scenarios and hence optimise the operating strategy to enhance the service life for future battery systems. The study includes real driving situations so that the derived findings can be used directly for optimisation of the life cycles of battery cells. So far, there has been no holistic model available for analysing battery life cycles. Conventional aging models are based solely on empirical calculations.
Mechanical Testing of Li-Ion Battery for Development of Finite Element Simulation Model
Mechanical Testing of Li-Ion Battery for Development of Finite Element Simulation Model
The high-voltage batteries of electric vehicles can be subject to high mechanical loads in accidents. Battery cells and modules of a Chinese supplier were selected for this research project in order investigate safety in accident scenarios. The data harvested serve as a basis for simulation programmes. Battery cells and modules are deformed until collapse in a laboratory test. The mechanical, electrical and thermal parameters of the battery that apply during the deformation were documented. The direction and speed of deformation, and the shape of the deformation body were varied in order to generate the dataset. Further measurements were then carried out on batteries of differing ages. The results obtained in this way will be used in future to optimise accident safety and the weight of battery powered vehicles.
Health and Well-Being: Fundamentals of Motion Sickness focused on a Stop & Go Scenario
Health and Well-Being: Fundamentals of Motion Sickness focused on a Stop & Go Scenario
Not everybody is able to tolerate journeys by car particularly well. Especially when carrying out activities during the journey, this has been a well-known phenomenon but so far there have been no technical countermeasures in manually controlled vehicles. Motion sickness is an important topic in connection with automated driving. A reproducible stop-&-go scenario is presented with two vehicles in order to generate the familiar symptoms. A system for recording physiological values for occupants is also presented.
Health and Well-Being: Biological Effects of Light – a novel Quality for Interior Lighting
Health and Well-Being: Biological Effects of Light – a novel Quality for Interior Lighting
The physiological effect of light also plays an important role in the development of automobiles. Strategically deployed lighting can lift mood, arouse attention and enhance the ability to concentrate. Even brief light impulses can contribute to this effect, counteract symptoms of fatigue and enhance the perception skills of the driver. The aim of this project is to develop lighting concepts that exert a positive impact on the wellbeing and the health of vehicle occupants. Short-term and long-term experiments are also being carried out to analyse issues such as the subjective and physiological effects of circadian lighting (matching the daily rhythm of human beings) in the interior of the vehicle. A prototype of an innovative lighting concept based on the interior of an Audi A8 is presented. Each of the specific characteristics is tailored to the vehicle passengers in the back.
Health and Well-Being: Concepts for Positive Influence on Health and Well-Being
Health and Well-Being: Concepts for Positive Influence on Health and Well-Being
The aspects of health and wellbeing in the vehicle are continuously gaining importance beyond our previous understanding of travel comfort. The project addresses various potential starting points to providing a maximally comfortable driving experience for driver and passengers. The research applications include innovative methods for analysis of air quality and for filtering pollutants in the interior of the vehicle, systems for registering medical emergencies and a smart jacket with integrated comfort sensors, regulated climate functions and the option of wireless charging in the vehicle.
Vehicle Data-Driven Environmental Monitoring: Air Quality Maps for Customers and Smart Cities
Vehicle Data-Driven Environmental Monitoring: Air Quality Maps for Customers and Smart Cities
One of the overriding future tasks is guaranteeing clean air in urban environments. Monitoring air quality helps to achieve this. This project has the objective of deploying vehicles as mobile air-quality analysts and using the data collected by them for the preparation of appropriate mapping. This approach enables the restricted number of monitoring stations available up to now, which are primarily stationary monitoring points, to be comprehensively supplemented so as to ensure a much better coverage for monitoring. Vehicles that have to carry out this function need to be fitted with appropriate sensors. A future objective is to enable air-quality predictions to be made using data analysis procedures such as machine learning methods – based on the data of the vehicle fleet used for transport. This will also provide the basis for smart city concepts relating to high air quality, optimised route recommendations and drive strategies based on air quality.
3D Printing Applications: Seat Concepts and More.
3D Printing Applications: Seat Concepts and More.
Additive production with the assistance of 3D printers offers a great deal of potential for issues such as design, development and production. It permits small production runs for the manufacture of special parts in small editions. For example, this means that weight-saving metal lattice systems and large-scale plastic components can be produced in 3D printing procedures. Components manufactured to individual customer requirements are ideally suited to additive procedures alongside parts produced in accordance with the special requirements of vehicle developers. A soft seat structure printed on a scale of 1:1 shows the areas in which innovative technology undergoing rapid development can be applied.

The Volkswagen test site at Ehra-Lessien

The story of mobility and dynamism can be told at several different places in the world. But nowhere else is the connection between production site and city so closely linked as in Wolfsburg. Nowhere other than the city in Lower Saxony are mobility, independence, freedom and rising affluence as all-embracing. The four smokestacks of the cogeneration power station at the Volkswagen Group are visible from afar and they are a landmark of this city.

The Volkswagen test circuit is located nearby at Ehra-Lessien and this too is inseparably linked with the concepts of mobility and dynamism. The test site was officially opened on 19 September 1968 and this year the circuit celebrates its 50th anniversary. The site is flat and wooded and it is located around 25 kilometres north of Wolfsburg. The area measures roughly ten kilometres long and one kilometre wide. This facility is regarded as the biggest test centre for motor vehicles in the world and it is used for all Group brands. The roadway system is about 100 kilometres long. This includes a 21-kilometre fast road with a straight section more than eight kilometres long and overbanked turns at the north and south ends with a radius of 380 metres, so that vehicles can drive at up to 200 km/h without experiencing any lateral forces. When the carriageway is dry, speeds of up to 300 km/h are possible.

The products of the Volkswagen Group are characterised by refined engineering, reliability, longevity and a high level of innovation. Test facilities permitting extremely tough and objective tests are required in order to meet these high standards. This starts with testing individual components and assemblies in the laboratory and ends with road tests for prototypes and series-ready vehicles at the test circuit.

Different types of road are available for a wide range of different tests. The uphill and downhill gradients are from five to 32 percent. Other sections have been designed as zigzag roads with hairpin bends similar to roads over Alpine passes. The vehicles can be tested on lots of different surfaces. Uneven tarmac roads, cobblestones and bumpy sections, potholes, bends with different radiuses, covered mud and salt-water thoroughfares, and a climbing hill and a steering test field with a particularly tight bend radius. The 25-hectare, trapezoid dynamic performance area in the southern half of the site is covered in asphalt with no joints. A wide range of different driving situations and new electronic driving assistants can be tested here. Some 1000 employees drive around 34 million kilometres on the Ehra test site every year.

All significant models from the Volkswagen Group have undertaken their first journeys here over the past five decades. And there has been a steady string of new records here. In 1973, racing driver Huschke von Hanstein set up the speed record in the relevant displacement class with a Porsche 914/4 and a Porsche Carrera RS. In 1985, an average speed of 208 km/h and a new 24-hour world record was established here with the VW Polo G40. In 2005 and 2010, the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 achieved new speed records for series vehicles: 431 km/h in 2010. In 2013, the Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse became the fastest road-legal roadster. In August 2017, the former Formula 1 driver Juan Pablo Montoya went on the ultimate shortest ever journey in a Bugatti Chiron lasting 41.96 seconds in which the vehicle accelerated from 0 to 400 km/h and then braked to a standstill.

Today, the Volkswagen Group is the biggest automobile manufacturer in the world – with more than 10.7 deliveries in 2017 and a global market share of 12.1 percent. In Western Europe, 22 percent of all new passenger cars come from the Volkswagen Group. The Group has 120 production facilities in more than 20 European countries and in 11 countries in North and South America, Asia and Africa. More than 642,000 employees around the world produce an average of 44,170 vehicles on each working day. These are marketed in 153 countries.

The Group has twelve brands from seven European countries: Volkswagen passenger cars, Audi, SEAT, SKODA, Bentley, Bugatti, Lamborghini, Porsche, Ducati, Volkswagen commercial vehicles, Scania and MAN. Each brand has a unique character and operates independently in the marketplace. The range covers motorcycles, through compact cars to vehicles in the luxury class. The product range for utility vehicles starts with pick-up trucks and extends to buses and heavy-duty trucks.

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Video-Footage SEDRIC

607, 2018

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